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Hannibal Review: Becoming

Nick, you'll have to direct us, please, to that interview where Fuller says that Lounds is dead - because I am not convinced in the slightest that she is. For two reasons: 1 - Freddie (or Freddy) Lounds is an extremely pivotal character in the "Red Dragon" novel, even more so than Chilton and Katz in the Harris novels (and Fuller's already killed those two off). Unless he's changing absolutely everything, Lounds isn't dead. I find it hard to believe that Fuller would kill Lounds now, given his desire to put Red Dragon to screen and the epically visual scenes that Freddy Lounds has in the novel. 2. I may turn out to be wrong, but I still think that this is all one very long con by Will Graham (and likely Jack Crawford). A few episodes ago, the fishing conversation between Jack and Will alluded to the notion that Will is using himself as bait for Jack to catch Lecter, and Jack approving. I hold firmly to the belief that this is all carefully orchestrated. I think that we're seeing what Hannibal sees, and we're only allowed that point of view. Hannibal needs to see Will as the killer he's unleashed, as his counterpart, and that's what we're seeing - down to the last image of their two faces merged. Will had to drag Freddie back in - he knew that if he allowed Freddie to go, she would either blow the whole con with her big mouth, or she would end up getting killed by Lecter (who was waiting at her hotel with a plastic suit).

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Arrow Review: Never Surrender

I both agree and disagree with you - if that's even possible on these here internets. I've read the comments and I've seen how personal this is for you, and I totally respect that. I can't really argue with empathy :-) I agree that it wasn't a great move on Oliver's part to hide. However, the motivation for his previous self-exile was very, very different, even though the result was the same. The first time he ran, he was feeling his limitations as a hero; his best friend died because he wasn't able to stop the second device (which he didn't know about). It was failure and self-doubt. This time, however, there's two things. For one, it's pure, unadulterated guilt and despair - which is what Slade was going for. Oliver's decisions - his Sophie's choice, his choice to not cure Slade, his choice not to tell his family about Slade - those decisions have cost him and his loved ones everything. The loss of his company and fortune, the loss of his sister's trust, the safety of his friends, the impending destruction of his beloved city...and the straw that broke the Arrow's back, the death of his mother. All because of him. The onslaught has been CONSTANT, and that's not the kind of $h!+ you can just shake off. Hell, if we as viewers need a break from the intensity of this storyline, imagine Oliver as the centre and cause of all of it. Two: Oliver didn't just go off to hide, but to come to terms with the decision to die. He was convinced that his death was the only thing that would stop this - and he needed time and space to be at peace with that decision. Oliver is still learning to be a hero, and the decision he made to sacrifice his life to save what's left of everyone's was heroic, even though it came at a time when it seems he'd have served better by being present for his loved ones. Was hiding a bad idea. Absolutely.
Do I blame him for hiding? Not in the least.

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I don't think "everyone" in the panel is saying that, and that's certainly not what I was trying to say. Perhaps I didn't word my thoughts properly. Last week we were asked if we thought she should go to DC, this week we were asked if she was in love. Separate questions, but there's no reason why her decision can't be contributed to by both her sense of independence AND her feelings for Pike. I think her hesitation is due to both. By no means was I trying to imply that her "not" being in love was the ONLY reason she was still in town.

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Hannibal Review: Evolution

I've been thinking about the ending of this episode - I'm willing to bet that Jack Crawford is in on this. I think he knows that Will killed that guy, and that this is part of the setup. Will is playing Hannibal, getting him to show himself and slip up. I don't think Will is so far lost to his own self that he would kill a guy and do what he's doing in the previews.

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1. I am SO HAPPY about a new big bad - especially with that bloody disappointing Haibach resolution weeks ago. This group hasn't been challenged quite yet, and this is just the thing to spice the show up a bit. 2. This was one of the best Patrick Jane episodes in a long time. We got to see so many of the great things about him, things that make him wonderfully complex. His caring side, his "mentalist" skills, his detective skills, the con man, the unsure/uncertain Patrick. Short of ruthless Patrick, this was like a Patrick Jane's greatest hits.

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I think that most of the FBI knew that they were in a relationship (as did Patrick), but only Abbott knew that Pike was being transferred, which I'm sure he only knew because he's in a position of authority. Jane's very savvy about human interaction, but he doesn't always pick up on things, or sometimes willfully ignores them, especially when it comes to Lisbon. I think he takes it for granted that he knows her really well, and is often surprised by an emotion or thought she has that he didn't anticipate. He couldn't tell Lisbon was upset back on their plane ride when he returned to the U.S., and he couldn't tell how much Lisbon really liked Pike.

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Grimm Review: Trubel Maker

I think it's highly plausible that she wouldn't know what a Grimm is. Nick had absolutely no idea what was going on when he started seeing things - and if his aunt hadn't come back to town to tell him, he would have thought he was nuts too. Nick was also lucky enough to have his first Wesen encounter be a reformed blutbad. Trubel is much younger than Nick was, she seems to be alone and she's seen the works. She would have had no one to tell her, and she can't exactly look it up in an encyclopedia. She's been surviving against all these Wesen who go berserk and attack when they see her...all she knows is to defend herself. I think it's safe to take her at face value. That being said, you could totally be right - she may be a double agent of some kind. We do know that the Royals had Grimms in the past.

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Hannibal Review: Evolution

Great review! This evolution, or this "becoming" as they put it in the therapy session, is a theme from the novel Red Dragon. The killer in the novel, Francis Dolarhyde, believes himself to be going through a process of "becoming". Though they've certainly not stuck with the canon, it's great to see those callouts to the novels. I loved Hannibal's reaction to the discussion of Bedelia Du Maurier. He let his guard down for about half a second and his voice was dripping with contempt for her. This episode did show us one thing: Will isn't unique to Dr Lecter. We've been going on the notion that Hannibal feels a connection to Will, and wants him as a friend and fellow killer. However, Hannibal views killing as a second nature to be encouraged, and as a psychiatrist, he's nurtured and evolved that second nature in anyone who has shown a glimpse of it. He did so with Randall, and is doing so with Margot. What Hannibal is doing with Will is what he always does. Maybe Will isn't so special after all.

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Arrow Review: Red Herring

Seriously. If THIS happened NOW, I can't even imagine what they have planned for the finale that's 3 episodes away. Have mercy.

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Arrow Review: Red Herring

WHAT. THE. HELL?!?!?!?! The red herring was literally red...a red hoodie. With Roy and his mirakuru madness being the central conflict of the episode, there was absolutely no indication of what was going to happen in the end. My goodness, what a heart-wrenching scene. The acting was incredible - Stephen Amell, Susanna Thomson and Willa Holland - really brought their A game to that. Nobody should ever have to make a Sophie's choice, and poor Oliver found himself in that situation a second time, and the despair he was feeling was almost tangible. And Moira...oh my goodness, Moira. I wasn't ready for that sacrifice, wasn't ready for her death. It makes sense, but I still wasn't ready for it. Thank you for the gray hair, Arrow. Honestly.