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Blue-bloods

Blue Bloods Review: The God Whisperer

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If you believe in God, how do you talk to Him and, more importantly, does He talk back? Those were some of the questions that "Leap of Faith" circled around on Blue Bloods.

When Sandy stood their screaming at Danny that God told her Charles killed her mother, she looked like a nut. That was, until the detectives found out that Charles first wife had committed suicide. Suddenly the grieving husband looked a little less innocent.

What is it with Danny? Sometimes he seems like a smart guy and other times I want to smack him. 

Danny and a Daughter

If he wanted information about the first wife's suicide, it would have been smart not to insult the detective on the case. There should have been a way to question him without basically calling the man an idiot. Speaking with the cop was a complete waste of time because Danny let his emotions get the better of him.

Until they got the doctor to confess to giving Charles the drugs I thought he had reasonable doubt on his side. The daughter could have planted the drugs when she stole his bag and killed her mother for the money. At least that's the story I would have spun if I were Charles lawyer. 

I was kind of disappointed Charles was the killer. I was rooting for him, as I've always like actor Timothy Busfield, but I suppose God doesn't lie.

And I was surprised how strongly Danny backed Sandy from the beginning. I would have thought his cop sense would have written her off but it looks like his Catholic upbringing also had quite an influence. But it was Jackie who made the connection to the patient named Berlin.

Across town, Frank was being asked to back a saint. It was sad to see that even sainthood is mired in politics as His Excellency pressured Frank to back their man. 

One of the best things about this story was that it gave Frank some very amusing lines when speaking to the priests about his views on sainthood. To wit:

My mother was a saint. My wife was a saint, especially by the time she was chasing four kids under 10 around the house. | permalink

I loved that Frank never caved into the pressure but was curious enough to do his own investigation. In the end he didn't find a saint, just a complicated man who tried to do what he thought was right and maybe that was enough. And as Frank said, the funny part of all of this was that...

If you told Father Bill he was a candidate for sainthood he'd laugh his ass off. | permalink

All of this led to another great Reagan family dinner as the group pondered life's mysteries, how they talked to God and whether God gave a shout out back. Erin was the most skeptical, as the brothers seemed to have a more open interpretation of communicating with God. The best part was hearing that when Frank speaks to God, the big guy calls him Frankie.

All in all, it was yet another entertaining night with the Reagans.

Review

Editor Rating: 4.3 / 5.0
  • 4.3 / 5.0
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User Rating:

Rating: 3.7 / 5.0 (52 Votes)

C. Orlando is a TV Fanatic Staff Writer. Follow her on Twitter.

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I love this show, but... a god-given clue? Really? Any "normal" cop would at least question how the girl came up with a clue that actually lead to solving the crime, which is suspicious, to say the least. If the girl was able to give that clue, it must mean at least that she investigated very thoroughly and had prior information that he didn't give to the police. Any normal cop would wonder whether she mightn't have played a part in the crime itself. But here? Nothing. "Ooooh thanks for the tip through your prophet, god!", and that's it. If the cops accept that, then why not hire the girl on other inquiries, since she seems to have the best snitch ever?? That is utterly ridiculous. I'll try to forget that crappy episode, because the show until then was pretty good.

Mrs-cleaver

Somebody called this "The Waltons Join the NYPD" which sums it up perfectly but I LOVE this show.

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I'm a tad mixed on this episode (and I love Blue Bloods)....Danny's cop behavior was more for the story/show than for real. Frank's personal investigation was a good move, but I was ultimately disappointed by his (cynical?) endorsement of this priest for sainthood, when in opening scenes, it was obvious politically-scented extortion on the part of the clergy to presure the likes of Frank, the PC, to personally support the cannonization of his old parish priest. I didn't buy it, and I'm Catholic! But then this is TV.....liberties taken, but it's not accurate.
Tom Selleck still carries this show and has the best lines!

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@poppysmom.......This site is for Blue Bloods, the show that you took a dig at in your comment, is also one I like very much, and think you are dead wrong about it. Since you are obviously a fan of one of its competitions, then watch them and comment on their site. Since this site is about Blue Bloods, I would like to say I liked this episode and the series. Whether you are Catholic or not, religious or atheists, I think its refreshing to see a show that is willing to take on the challenge of religion, which is so much a part of this country. Whether you believe religion should or should not be in our lives and politics, it is. To see a family get together for Sunday dinner and show a commitment to the family itself is becoming extinct. This is the core of the show, that shows family, duty to job, personal beliefs, and how they can conflict. This is not on any other show on TV and I think they do it very well. I hope that it is renewed for another season.

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This show is on a slippery slope. God is solving the cases, terrorists are saints. GIVE ME A BRAKE.

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The guy the priest Helped was what we today would call a Domestic Terrorist. At least that was my understanding. No "Saint" could help such a person escape Justice. The guy deserved to go to Prison.

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Canonization, the process the Church uses to name a saint, has only been used since the tenth century. For hundreds of years, starting with the first martyrs of the early Church, saints were chosen by public acclaim. Though this was a more democratic way to recognize saints, some saints' stories were distorted by legend and some never existed. Gradually, the bishops and finally the Vatican took over authority for approving saints.

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Only after one more miracle will the pope canonize the saint (this includes martyrs as well). The title of saint tells us that the person lived a holy life, is in heaven, and is to be honored by the universal Church. Canonization does not "make" a person a saint; it recognizes what God has already done. Though canonization is infallible and irrevocable, it takes a long time and a lot of effort. So while every person who is canonized is a saint, not every holy person has been canonized.

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The next step, beatification, requires evidence of one miracle (except in the case of martyrs). Since miracles are considered proof that the person is in heaven and can intercede for us, the miracle must take place after the candidate's death and as a result of a specific petition to the candidate. When the pope proclaims the candidate beatified or "blessed," the person can be venerated by a particular region or group of people with whom the person holds special importance.

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In 1983, Pope John Paul II made sweeping changes in the canonization procedure. The process begins after the death of a Catholic whom people regard as holy. Often, the process starts many years after death in order give perspective on the candidate. The local bishop investigates the candidate's life and writings for heroic virtue (or martyrdom) and orthodoxy of doctrine. Then a panel of theologians at the Vatican evaluates the candidate. After approval by the panel and cardinals of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, the pope proclaims the candidate "venerable."