Sarah Drew Dishes on Dream Grey's Anatomy Gig

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Before joining the cast of Grey's Anatomy, Sarah Drew made a name for herself with memorable stints on Everwood, Mad Men, Supernatural, Private Practice and more.

In a new interview, she opens up about what's next for Dr. April Kepner, what it's like working with the cast of Grey's Anatomy, her other roles and what TV she loves.

Excerpts from her Q&A with Digital Airwaves' Brittany Frederick below ...

On what's coming up for April: "There’s a little spark of interest romantically that begins to happen, but it does not go according to plan. We’re going to see her sort of dealing with that. They’re really playing with the fact that my character’s a virgin."

S. Drew

On being promoted to series regular: "It’s pretty amazing. I came on to the show and I was told from day one that I was only going to be there for two episodes."

"I knew from day one that my character was getting fired after two episodes. I did not expect anything beyond that. The morning my firing episode aired, my agent got a call that they were talking about a contract and I was just completely floored."

On the benefits of such a large cast: "It’s kind of the most ideal situation for an actor because you have time to have a real life. Some episodes I’ll only be working three days, other episodes will be heavier and I’ll have a lot more work. It’s a really nice situation."

"I wake up every morning pinching myself. It’s so rare to be part of a show that’s so well written and everyone is so lovely to be around. I’m so happy to be where I am."

On working with Shonda Rhimes: "[Private Practice] was the first time that I worked for Shonda. She cast me in that role and then I did her pilot that she did last pilot season (Inside the Box). After doing her pilot, she brought me on to Grey’s."

On guest starring on Glee and Mad Men: "I was beside myself because I grew up doing musical theater. I totally related to that character. But I didn’t really know what the scope of it was. Doing Mad Men was one of those beautiful artistic moments to me. Mad Men is a really, really special show. It’s written incredibly well. So I was just excited to sink my teeth into that material."

On shows she'd love to be on: "I really wanted to go and do something on Friday Night Lights. That was my favorite show. There’s a new show with my friend Garret Dillahunt called Raising Hope. We met a long time ago when I first graduated from college."

On the other shows she loves: "I also love like House and Bones. I watch some of those procedural shows. I watch True Blood and Vampire Diaries. Rookie Blue, I love. I was always watching Grey’s from day one. Anything with heart and interesting characters."

Steve Marsi is the Managing Editor of TV Fanatic. Follow him on Google+ or email him here.

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Grey's Anatomy Quotes

Lexie: [narrating] Grief may be a thing we all have in common, but it looks different on everyone.
Mark: It isn't just death we have to grieve. It's life. It's loss. It's change.
Alex: And when we wonder why it has to suck so much sometimes, has to hurt so bad. The thing we gotta try to remember is that it can turn on a dime.
Izzie: That's how you stay alive. When it hurts so much you can't breathe, that's how you survive.
Derek: By remembering that one day, somehow, impossibly, you won't feel this way. It won't hurt this much.
Bailey: Grief comes in its own time for everyone, in its own way.
Owen: So the best we can do, the best anyone can do, is try for honesty.
Meredith: The really crappy thing, the very worst part of grief is that you can't control it.
Arizona: The best we can do is try to let ourselves feel it when it comes.
Callie: And let it go when we can.
Meredith: The very worst part is that the minute you think you're past it, it starts all over again.
Cristina: And always, every time, it takes your breath away.
Meredith: There are five stages of grief. They look different on all of us, but there are always five.
Alex: Denial.
Derek: Anger.
Bailey: Bargaining.
Lexie: Depression.
Richard: Acceptance.

There's a reason I said I'd be happy alone. It wasn't 'cause I thought I'd be happy alone. It was because I thought if I loved someone and then it fell apart, I might not make it. It's easier to be alone, because what if you learn that you need love and you don't have it? What if you like it and lean on it? What if you shape your life around it and then it falls apart? Can you even survive that kind of pain? Losing love is like organ damage. It's like dying. The only difference is death ends. This? It could go on forever.

Meredith